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Thread: 68 psi too much?

  1. #1

    Default 68 psi too much?

    I know the recommended fuel pressure is 58-60 psi. Is 68 psi too much? I have the hose from the Master Kit for the feed to the passenger front port and the stock 3/8" line for the return line. I haven’t drove it yet, but seems to idle fine. I hate to pull the regulator out to check for debris and cause a problem. I did purge the new feed line six times before hooking it up to the TBI.

    I’ve recently heard Holley doesn’t recommend the use of 45° elbows. Unfortunately I have a 90° on the inlet and a 180° off the regulator! I didn’t think the regulator 180° would be a big deal because it should only be a couple psi. What do you guys think? Leave it at 68 psi or try to find the problem. It’s just on a pretty much stock ‘70 350.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    Connecticut
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    23,433

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    I'd determine why it's 10 psi over the fuel pressure regulator.
    May God's grace bless you in the Lord Jesus Christ.
    '92 Ford Mustang GT: 385" SBF, Dart SHP 8.2 block, TFS TW 11R 205 heads, 11.8:1 comp, TFS R-Series intake, Dominator MPFI & DIS, 36-1 crank trigger/1x cam sync, 160A 3G alternator, Optima Red battery, A/C, 100HP progressive dry direct-port NOS, Spal dual 12" fans/3-core Frostbite aluminum radiator, Pypes dual 2.5" exhaust/off-road X-pipe/shorty headers, S&W subframe connectors, LenTech Strip Terminator wide-ratio AOD/3000 RPM converter, FPP aluminum driveshaft, FPP 3.31 gears, Cobra Trac-Lok differential, Moser 31 spline axles, '04 Cobra 4-disc brakes, '93 Cobra booster & M/C, 5-lug Bullitt wheels & MT 245/45R17 tires.

  3. #3
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    Run a garden hose straight off the regulator into a bucket, then recheck fuel pressure. Your 180° or some part of your return line could be a restriction. Gary
    Regards, Gary

  4. #4

    Default

    And try another gauge before condemning the regulator.

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Connecticut
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    I agree, try another fuel pressure gauge.
    May God's grace bless you in the Lord Jesus Christ.
    '92 Ford Mustang GT: 385" SBF, Dart SHP 8.2 block, TFS TW 11R 205 heads, 11.8:1 comp, TFS R-Series intake, Dominator MPFI & DIS, 36-1 crank trigger/1x cam sync, 160A 3G alternator, Optima Red battery, A/C, 100HP progressive dry direct-port NOS, Spal dual 12" fans/3-core Frostbite aluminum radiator, Pypes dual 2.5" exhaust/off-road X-pipe/shorty headers, S&W subframe connectors, LenTech Strip Terminator wide-ratio AOD/3000 RPM converter, FPP aluminum driveshaft, FPP 3.31 gears, Cobra Trac-Lok differential, Moser 31 spline axles, '04 Cobra 4-disc brakes, '93 Cobra booster & M/C, 5-lug Bullitt wheels & MT 245/45R17 tires.

  6. #6

    Default

    Right, first confirm that the pressure reading is correct. If it is, then you might have a bad regulator, or you're overpowering the regulator with too powerful of a pump.

  7. #7

    Default

    I understand everyone is trying to help him diagnose why he's getting 68 psi, but his original question is still bouncing around in my head. Is 68 psi too much? What would that do to a Sniper system? Would it cause it to run rich, lean or the same? Thanks, Danford1

  8. #8

    Default

    68 psi probably isn't too much for the injectors to handle, but it will change the calibration. You can do the math to tell you how more fuel will flow at 68 psi vs 58 psi.

  9. #9

    Default

    I decided to pull the regulator out and the little blue plastic screen was stuck sideways in the throttle body, but it may have just popped off while removing the regulator. I didn’t see any debris on the screen, but blew it out just to be sure. Put it back together and now it’s reading 64 psi. Let it warm up and jabbed the throttle a few times and it stayed at 64 psi. I guess I will call it OK if it stays there after the next couple starts. If not, I will run a hose to a gas can like suggested above. If it does stay at 64 psi, I understand there's a setting for actual fuel pressure somewhere. FYI: I’m using a new Aeromotive Stealth tank.
    Last edited by 70Monte; 12-05-2019 at 09:15 PM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Connecticut
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    23,433

    Default

    I suggest replacing that fuel pressure regulator. I wouldn't trust it.
    May God's grace bless you in the Lord Jesus Christ.
    '92 Ford Mustang GT: 385" SBF, Dart SHP 8.2 block, TFS TW 11R 205 heads, 11.8:1 comp, TFS R-Series intake, Dominator MPFI & DIS, 36-1 crank trigger/1x cam sync, 160A 3G alternator, Optima Red battery, A/C, 100HP progressive dry direct-port NOS, Spal dual 12" fans/3-core Frostbite aluminum radiator, Pypes dual 2.5" exhaust/off-road X-pipe/shorty headers, S&W subframe connectors, LenTech Strip Terminator wide-ratio AOD/3000 RPM converter, FPP aluminum driveshaft, FPP 3.31 gears, Cobra Trac-Lok differential, Moser 31 spline axles, '04 Cobra 4-disc brakes, '93 Cobra booster & M/C, 5-lug Bullitt wheels & MT 245/45R17 tires.

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