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Thread: Holley HyperSpark Distributor - Rotor Phasing

  1. #1

    Default Holley HyperSpark Distributor - Rotor Phasing

    Hi. I'm running a BB Chevy with Nitrous and Sniper EFI Stealth 4500 with Holley HyperSpark distributor kit (565-300K). I have a problem phasing the rotor when running low timing 18°, then it'll be the width of the rotor tip past the terminal and this leads to some misfire. Now I've tried to go from the recommend 57.5° Ignition Reference Angle to 40°. After that, my base timing was too high, so I manually turned the distributor to put it back on target and now my rotor is spot on.
    Anyone know if this is the right way to do it? I'd like to know before I'm racing again. Thanks, Peter. Sorry for my bad English, but I'm almost at the other side of earth.

  2. #2

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    I'd leave the Ignition Reference Angle at the factory 57.5 setting. All you need to do is to install the distributor so the rotor is pointed at the #1 tower when you're at the timing you're going to use for max power. If you run 34° at wide open throttle, then point the rotor at #1 tower when the crank is at 34° before TDC. If you want to split the difference between the low speed spot and the WOT spot you can do that instead. Personally I only worry about the rotor position at WOT, but I can see why a person might want to split the difference.

  3. #3

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    Thanks for your feedback. :-) The reason for my "split", is that at full throttle I'll have from 16° to 29° timing. This is because I run with a retard ramp to control power, so when leaving I have 16°, and then 1.4 second after I have full ignition timing (29°) to prevent losing traction. And then at the return distance, I run with 37° timing. Is there any problem doing that by setting the Ignition Reference Angle to 40°? Thanks, Peter

  4. #4

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    The Reference Angle is there for a reason. You need to understand what it's doing before you change it. If your max timing is going to be 29° then 40° might be okay as a Reference Angle, but you should do the math before you make the change.

    In your case, you could point the rotor to #1 tower when the crank is at 23° BTDC and be pretty close to splitting the difference. I'd still use the Holley Reference Angle. I don't see any reason to change the Reference Angle, that just makes the whole process more complicated than it needs to be.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by andyf View Post
    The Reference Angle is there for a reason. You need to understand what it's doing before you change it.
    http://www.masterenginetuner.com/top...all-fails.html (Crank Reference Angle Importance)

    I'd still use the Holley Reference Angle. I don't see any reason to change the Reference Angle, that just makes the whole process more complicated than it needs to be.
    Also, changing the inherent Ignition Reference Angle negatively affects rotor phasing.
    May God's grace bless you in the Lord Jesus Christ.
    '92 Ford Mustang GT: 385" SBF, Dart SHP 8.2 block, TFS TW 11R 205 heads, 11.8:1 comp, TFS R-Series intake, Dominator MPFI & DIS, 36-1 crank trigger/1x cam sync, 160A 3G alternator, Optima Red battery, A/C, 100HP progressive dry direct-port NOS, Spal dual 12" fans/3-core Frostbite aluminum radiator, Pypes dual 2.5" exhaust/off-road X-pipe/shorty headers, S&W subframe connectors, LenTech Strip Terminator wide-ratio AOD/2800 RPM converter, M4602G aluminum driveshaft, FRPP 3.31 gears, Cobra Trac-Lok differential, Moser 31 spline axles, '04 Cobra 4-disc brakes, '93 Cobra booster & M/C, 5-lug Bullitt wheels & 245/45R17 tires.

  6. #6

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    Holley spent a lot of time developing the HyperSpark distributor and the plastic cap for phasing the rotor. I sure wouldn't change the Reference Angle entry in the software away from what Holley recommends. My guess is that it should work for 99.9% of the applications out there. So if it were my engine, I'd be looking for something else causing the problem. You say you are having problems at 18° timing. What kind of problems? That's not all that low.

    Did you originally setup the HyperSpark distributor exactly like they say using the plastic cap? Then checking timing using the "Static Timing" feature on the handheld?
    69 Camaro
    400 SBC, ProCharger D1SC

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by andyf View Post
    The Reference Angle is there for a reason. You need to understand what it's doing before you change it. If your max timing is going to be 29° then 40° might be okay as a Reference Angle, but you should do the math before you make the change.

    In your case, you could point the rotor to #1 tower when the crank is at 23° BTDC and be pretty close to splitting the difference. I'd still use the Holley Reference Angle. I don't see any reason to change the Reference Angle, that just makes the whole process more complicated than it needs to be.
    Please remember that I do not run with a crank sensor, but only with the build-in sensor in the HyperSpark distributor, so if I turn the distributor, I also turn the sensor and the cap so the phasing between those two will keep the same. If you take a look at the attached picture you can see that my cap tells that it's out of phasing. Thanks, Peter

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by ezstreet; 08-12-2019 at 01:17 PM.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by gregs69rs View Post
    Holley spent a lot of time developing the HyperSpark distributor and the plastic cap for phasing the rotor. I sure wouldn't change the Reference Angle entry in the software away from what Holley recommends. My guess is that it should work for 99.9% of the applications out there. So if it were my engine, I'd be looking for something else causing the problem. You say you are having problems at 18° timing. What kind of problems? That's not all that low.

    Did you originally setup the HyperSpark distributor exactly like they say using the plastic cap? Then checking timing using the "Static Timing" feature on the handheld?
    Yes, I've done it all by the book, but still it's having misfire at low timing. Please see other post for picture of my cap showing that the rotor is ahead of the terminal when firing. Thanks, Peter

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