Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 16 of 16

Thread: PWM Electric Fan Control (Again)

  1. #11

    Default

    With any of these measurements, you really should be asking the question in Watts, not Amps. Amps changes with Voltage: the same 100 Watt bulb draws 8.7 Amps @ 11.5 Volts, but only 7.1 Amps @ 14 Volts, which is the difference between a low battery and having the alternator working hard.
    Andrew

  2. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Danny Cabral View Post
    SPAL has their own programmable fan controller, but I'm not sure I like it and the instructions aren't very good: http://www.spal-usa.com/fans/automat...es/fanpwm.html (SPAL FAN-PWM Controller) However, their electric cooling fans are the best in the industry.
    That kinda looks like the Derale one that takes a temperature input, not a PWM input.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bigfella237 View Post
    With any of these measurements, you really should be asking the question in Watts, not Amps. Amps changes with Voltage: the same 100 Watt bulb draws 8.7 Amps @ 11.5 Volts, but only 7.1 Amps @ 14 Volts, which is the difference between a low battery and having the alternator working hard.
    Understood. But I don't have a Watts meter and it doesn't explain the discrepancy we're seeing.

  3. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by racindego View Post
    The solution I found, the MCP233: https://www.basicmicro.com/MCP233-Du...ller_p_39.html
    You can read the specs, but this is basically a DC motor controller that accepts a PWM+ input (among other input possibilities) and can handle 60 amps or 2 x 30 amps. Perfect for two fans. It's made for robotics and people who have some level of electronics and robotics experience, which is NOT me, but I was still able to get through it with some help from the guy at Basic Motion, who is extremely knowledgeable & helpful. This module is fully programmable with the free software and has way more capability than what I'm using it for, but I have it up & running and it's flawless.

    So there you have it. A compact, high amperage, readily available, and easy to wire fan controller for $200.
    PS: There are cheaper versions of this same idea available, but they have their disadvantages, IMO. They are usually just circuit boards, not a potted, enclosed module like we'd want for an underhood environment, and they also don't have the same level of tech support. If you're adventurous though, you can probably do what I did for a lot less money.
    I'm using a C6 controller and fan on my C3 an they work perfectly with the HP ECU. I'll be using another controller for a Davies Craig EWP. This controller is designed for an automotive environment and connect directly to the HP ECU.

    I'm looking for a controller for the fuel pump. I can't use the C6 because the have a soft start and don't respond as fast as it's needed for fuel control. How are you controlling this unit with Holley's ECU? I see they're rated for 5V logic control voltage. Are you using PWM or pulse duration (as in RC servo)? Regards.

  4. #14

    Default

    It accepts a very wide range of input voltage. Simply pin the Holley PWM+ into the unit. No issues.

  5. #15

    Default

    For what it's worth, the new SPAL brushless fans have a built-in controller. Check out the C7 fan. It's rated at 600 watts and SPAL offer the mating connector for it for about $25. It just needs 8 AWG ground & power and a small PWM- signal wire. If I was to do this again, I'd be looking at doing this. The C7 fan is about $200. The programming is similar, but needs 100 Hz instead of the 128 Hz that the C6 controller needs. Andrew
    IG @projectgattago

  6. #16

    Default

    Andrewb70, that seems like a really great setup. That's probably the route I'd go also if the shroud was workable.

    Side note: The controller I used can accept multiple inputs and the 2 outputs do not need to be linked to each other or the same input. In other words, you could potentially use 1 output channel to control a fuel pump and the other for an electric fan. Assuming you don't exceed 30 amps per channel.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
About us
Holley has been the undisputed leader in fuel systems for over 100 years. Holley carburetors have powered every NASCAR® Sprint® Cup team and nearly every NHRA® Pro–Stock champion for four decades. Now, Holley EFI is dominating the performance world as well as our products for GM's LS engine. Holley's products also include performance fuel pumps, intake manifolds & engine dress–up products for street performance, race and marine applications. As a single solution, or partnered with products from other Holley companies - Hooker Headers, Flowtech Headers, NOS Nitrous, Weiand, Earl's Performance Plumbing, or Diablosport - Holley products can give you the edge you need over the competition.
Join us