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Thread: Wiring factory ABS sensor into HP.

  1. #1

    Default Wiring factory ABS sensor into HP.

    Hey everyone, long time lurker, first time poster. I want to wire in a Hall-Effect sensor from the driveshaft into one of my inputs and use the sine wave signal from the front ABS sensor on my '97 Cobra into another input. I know that the HP doesn't support the front ABS sensor, but I have this nifty little Dakota Digital signal converter that will convert the sine wave from the ABS sensor to a square wave that the Holley should accept. The purpose of doing this is to compare the two signals for a poor-man's traction control. Is it a good idea to convert the signal from the ABS sensor for this purpose? Are there issues at low RPM or with some kind of latency/accuracy or something from converting the signal? Anyone who has experience with this, please chime in and let me know if this is a bad idea and why.

  2. #2

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    This should work, but I have a feeling that the ABS sensor will be laggy. I use an ABS sensor for the speedometer and I notice it doesn't work instantly when the car moves. Andrew
    IG @projectgattago

  3. #3

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    I've used the ABS sensors to a Dominator from both rear wheels and one front on a 2000 GT, worked perfectly.

  4. #4
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    As well they should, since they're high tooth count reluctor wheels.
    May God's grace bless you in the Lord Jesus Christ.
    '92 Ford Mustang GT: 385" SBF, Dart SHP 8.2 block, TFS TW 11R 205 heads, 11.8:1 comp, TFS R-Series intake, Dominator MPFI & DIS, 36-1 crank trigger/1x cam sync, 160A 3G alternator, Optima Red battery, A/C, 100HP progressive dry direct-port NOS, Spal dual 12" fans/3-core Frostbite aluminum radiator, Pypes dual 2.5" exhaust/off-road X-pipe/shorty headers, S&W subframe connectors, LenTech Strip Terminator wide-ratio AOD/2800 RPM converter, M4602G aluminum driveshaft, FRPP 3.31 gears, Cobra Trac-Lok differential, Moser 31 spline axles, '04 Cobra 4-disc brakes, '93 Cobra booster & M/C, 5-lug Bullitt wheels & 245/45R17 tires.

  5. #5

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    Sorry to rehash the old thread. Has anyone converted the signal to be used on an HP? I understand the Dominator can take the signal, but I wonder if converting the signal would work for comparing against a Hall-Effect on the driveshaft. I'd rather not have to bust a scope out to see if there is latency (enough to impact a comparison between the two signals) introduced between a converted signal and the driveshaft signal. LOL.

  6. #6

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    Yes, I use it for my speed sensor input, the signal is generate from the T56 VSS (sine-wave VR). I’d set it up for H-L and use Output 2. That should get you close, then adjust from there. Outputs 1 & 3 are a sine-wave like a 2-wire sensor. Outputs 2, 4 & 5 are a square wave like a 3-wire sensor. Honestly, I'm not 100% sure it was Output 2 or 4, must recheck it.

  7. #7

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    Use the Calibrated AC Output signal from the Dakota Digital SGI-5 device. It will work better than the 2000 PPM OC output.
    Any inductive speed sensor will require a minimum speed for signal strength, so yes you can expect some type of delay and drop out near 0 RPM.
    The SGI-5 can be a little flaky in general, so expect a loss of signal occasionally.

  8. #8

    Default Digital driveshaft sensor on HP ECU?

    What about a digital 2-wire driveshaft sensor? What do I use for this? I don't see a PW I/O in the diagram. Am I screwed?

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by froman View Post
    Hey everyone, long time lurker, first time poster. I want to wire in a Hall-Effect sensor from the driveshaft into one of my inputs and use the sine wave signal from the front ABS sensor on my '97 Cobra into another input. I know that the HP doesn't support the front ABS sensor, but I have this nifty little Dakota Digital signal converter that will convert the sine wave from the ABS sensor to a square wave that the Holley should accept. The purpose of doing this is to compare the two signals for a poor-man's traction control. Is it a good idea to convert the signal from the ABS sensor for this purpose? Are there issues at low RPM or with some kind of latency/accuracy or something from converting the signal? Anyone who has experience with this, please chime in and let me know if this is a bad idea and why.
    Any info on this converter?

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by turbofreak View Post
    What about a digital 2-wire driveshaft sensor? What do I use for this? I don't see a PW I/O in the diagram. Am I screwed?
    The option types in the Inputs/Outputs ICF are Digital Speed/Frequency or IPU Speed/Frequency.

    Originally Posted by Holley EFI Wiring Manual & Diagrams
    9.0 Programmable Inputs & Outputs
    Programmable input and outputs are intended to be any input or output that is created by the user when a Global Folder is configured. Once configured, they must be assigned a to a specific pin location on the Pin Map, and then physically wired per the assigned location.

    NOTE 1: As a standard wiring practice, DO NOT wire any input or output to a source that draws more than 2 amps. This is especially true when connecting to something with a “coil”, such as any type of solenoid. If the device exceeds 2 amps, you should connect the input or output to the trigger side of the relay used to power the device, not directly to the device. Note that this 2 amp limit pertains to inputs as well (not just outputs). When depowered, some solenoids create a large fly-back voltage that is fed directly back into an input trigger of the ECU, if that input is directly connected to the solenoid.

    9.1 Inputs
    There are seven types of inputs that can be configured. The following lists them and reviews wiring recommendations. The designation on the Pin Map (Inputs) is given first, then a description.
    1. “H” – Switched 12V or “High Side” input – This input will be triggered when system voltage is applied. Minimum triggering voltage is 4.5V. Do not exceed 24V.
    Wiring: Connect up to any voltage source that is desired to trigger this input. See NOTE 1 above.
    2. “G” – Switched Ground or “Low Side” input – This input will be triggered when a ground is applied.
    Wiring: Connect up to any ground source that is desired to trigger this input. See NOTE 1 above.
    3. “5” – 0-5 volt sensor input – Any 0-5 volt sensor input such as a TPS, MAP sensor, pressure transducer, and many others.
    Wiring: Wire the signal wire from the 0-5V sensor used into the appropriate pin. Any 0-5V sensor requires a +5V reference voltage and a sensor ground. Each HEFI connector that has 0-5V inputs has its own +5V reference voltage output and sensor ground. These need to be properly wired to each 0-5V sensor used.
    It is acceptable to have multiple sensors share the same +5V and ground reference lines. Be sure to solder, heat shrink, etc. wires properly as poor connections will cause for inaccurate or faulty sensor readings.
    Do not use +5V reference or ground sources from other controllers or power supplies to support the sensor, or sensor accuracy may be compromised.
    4. “2” – 0-20 volt sensor input – Any 0-20 volt sensor input
    Wiring: Connect to desired voltage input.
    5. “T” – Thermistor temperature input – Most coolant and air temperature sensors are a 2 wire “thermistor” design.
    Wiring: Connect to one side of the thermistor device. Connect the other side of the thermistor device to a “Sensor Ground” input pin to the ECU (same pins for a 0-5V sensor).
    6. “F” – Frequency or a Digital Speed Input – Designed for a digital voltage input from a speed/rotation sensor. A Hall-Effect sensor is the common sensor used. Voltage range can be 4.5 to 24 volts.
    Wiring: A Hall-Effect sensor has 3 wires: Power, Ground, and Signal. Most sensors can be supplied with battery voltage (12V), a few require a 5 volt reference. Check with the specifications of your specific sensor. Although not usually needed with a Hall-Effect sensor, it is always advised to use a shielded/grounded cable to wire them (all three wires can be shielded). The following is advised when wiring a Hall-Effect sensor.
    Signal – Run the sensor signal wire into the Pin Mapped channel
    Power – Either supply with clean switched power, or if it is not used for another purpose, you can power from Pin P1B-B20 which is a clean 12V power source. If the sensor requires 5 volts, use a +5V reference line.
    Ground – It is best to connect to an IPU (Inductive/Magnetic Pickup) or Sensor Ground.
    Shield Wire – If using shielded/grounded cable, connect the shield ground wire to the ECU only. It is best to connect it to an IPU ground.
    7. “S” – Inductive Speed Input – Designed for an A/C voltage input from a speed/rotation sensor. A magnetic sensor is the common sensor used. The minimum arming voltage is 50 mV.
    Wiring: It is highly advised to always use a shielded/grounded cable for any inductive signal. They are very susceptible to noise. An inductive sensor has two wires - a “positive” and “negative”. Connect the positive lead to the “S” input pin that was Pin Mapped. Connect the negative side to an IPU ground.

    9.2 Outputs
    All PWM (Pulse Width Modulated) and switched outputs are rated at a maximum of 2A. If a device will draw more than 2A, some type or relay must be used. If the output is PWM, do not use a “switching” relay, but rather a solid state type relay designed to be pulse width modulated.
    There are four types of outputs that can be configured. The following lists them and reviews wiring recommendations. The designation on the Pin Map (Outputs) is given first, then a description.
    1. “H” – Switched 12V or “High Side” output – will output system voltage level.
    Wiring: Connect the pin to the device to be triggered. See NOTE 1 above.
    2. “G” – Ground or “Low Side” output – will output a ground trigger.
    Wiring: Connect the pin to the device to be triggered. See NOTE 1 above.
    3. “P+” - 12V Pulse Width Modulated output – Outputs a high side pulse width modulated output to control items such as a progressive nitrous solenoid or a PWM IAC – will output system voltage level. See NOTE 1 above.
    Wiring: Connect the pin to the device to be triggered. A PWM device has 2 wires, connector the other side of the device to ground.
    4. “P-” – Ground Pulse Width Modulated output – Outputs a low side pulse width modulated output to control items such as a progressive nitrous solenoid or a PWM IAC. See NOTE 1 above.
    Wiring: Connect the pin to the device to be triggered. A PWM device has 2 wires, connector the other side of the device to a voltage source.
    May God's grace bless you in the Lord Jesus Christ.
    '92 Ford Mustang GT: 385" SBF, Dart SHP 8.2 block, TFS TW 11R 205 heads, 11.8:1 comp, TFS R-Series intake, Dominator MPFI & DIS, 36-1 crank trigger/1x cam sync, 160A 3G alternator, Optima Red battery, A/C, 100HP progressive dry direct-port NOS, Spal dual 12" fans/3-core Frostbite aluminum radiator, Pypes dual 2.5" exhaust/off-road X-pipe/shorty headers, S&W subframe connectors, LenTech Strip Terminator wide-ratio AOD/2800 RPM converter, M4602G aluminum driveshaft, FRPP 3.31 gears, Cobra Trac-Lok differential, Moser 31 spline axles, '04 Cobra 4-disc brakes, '93 Cobra booster & M/C, 5-lug Bullitt wheels & 245/45R17 tires.

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