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Thread: Timing Setup

  1. #1

    Default Timing Setup

    Sequential Multi-Port, Coil-On-Plug, Hall-Effect cam sensor. I want to say I can be dense at times, bare with me please, LOL. I'm using the 60-2 wheel & crank sensor. A Hall-Effect cam signal distributor and Coil-On-Plug. Here's a LINK.

    What is the proper way to set the timing? Because at the moment, at idle with timing light, it's 0°. And when I rev the engine, it shows on the timing light to move to only 20° advance. The laptop shows 18° idle and 36° max, which the timing light is telling me ain't happening.

    I did set Static Timing at 30° and I disabled the Idle Spark setting, and nothing changed. Before I do anything I wanted to check here and confirm what steps I need to take to ensure the system is handling my timing correctly.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    Connecticut
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    Read this thread: https://forums.holley.com/showthread...ing-Holley-EFI (Ignition Timing Synchronization)
    May God's grace bless you in the Lord Jesus Christ.
    '92 Ford Mustang GT: 385" SBF, Dart SHP 8.2 block, TFS TW 11R 205 heads, 11.8:1 comp, TFS R-Series intake, Dominator MPFI & DIS, 36-1 crank trigger/1x cam sync, 160A 3G alternator, Optima Red battery, A/C, 100HP progressive dry direct-port NOS, Spal dual 12" fans/3-core Frostbite aluminum radiator, Pypes dual 2.5" exhaust/off-road X-pipe/shorty headers, S&W subframe connectors, LenTech Strip Terminator wide-ratio AOD/2800 RPM converter, M4602G aluminum driveshaft, FRPP 3.31 gears, Cobra Trac-Lok differential, Moser 31 spline axles, '04 Cobra 4-disc brakes, '93 Cobra booster & M/C, 5-lug Bullitt wheels & 245/45R17 tires.

  3. #3

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    Thanks Danny, Am I correct thinking my timing is adjusted by the crank trigger NOT the cam sensor distributor? And once I command a 30° Static Timing, I move the crank sensor until I achieve that setting?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    Connecticut
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    Yes, you must move the crank sensor, not the cam sensor.
    May God's grace bless you in the Lord Jesus Christ.
    '92 Ford Mustang GT: 385" SBF, Dart SHP 8.2 block, TFS TW 11R 205 heads, 11.8:1 comp, TFS R-Series intake, Dominator MPFI & DIS, 36-1 crank trigger/1x cam sync, 160A 3G alternator, Optima Red battery, A/C, 100HP progressive dry direct-port NOS, Spal dual 12" fans/3-core Frostbite aluminum radiator, Pypes dual 2.5" exhaust/off-road X-pipe/shorty headers, S&W subframe connectors, LenTech Strip Terminator wide-ratio AOD/2800 RPM converter, M4602G aluminum driveshaft, FRPP 3.31 gears, Cobra Trac-Lok differential, Moser 31 spline axles, '04 Cobra 4-disc brakes, '93 Cobra booster & M/C, 5-lug Bullitt wheels & 245/45R17 tires.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
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    Ont. Canada
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    1,396

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    If your timing is off with a 60-2 wheel your sensor is not set to the proper tooth at TDC. All this info is in the Help section.
    Quote Originally Posted by Holley EFI Crank & Cam Sensor Setup
    1.3 60-2 Wheel
    The following covers the installation of a 60-2 crank trigger wheel Holley offers. Holley offers kits for Small and Big Block Chevy engines to mount the sensor and wheel. Four different diameter 60-2 wheels are available that can be custom mounted on any engine.

    The “60-2” alludes to the fact that crank trigger wheel has 58 teeth with “2 missing”. This is also known as a “58x” wheel. The “missing” teeth are used as an ident so that the ECU can recognize the exact angular position of the crankshaft. Having 58 teeth allows the ECU to much more precisely calculate engine speed compared to a trigger wheel with less teeth.

    To set up a 60-2 wheel:
    1. Rotate the engine to #1 TDC.
    2. The software has a parameter called “TDC Tooth Number”. This is typically set to “10”. The example below will use 10 as this value. Do not set it below a value of 9 for best timing accuracy. Values higher are acceptable, but you need to make sure the cam sensor is installed appropriately if one is used (see section 2.2).
    3. With the engine at TDC on #1 cylinder, the sensor will be positioned such that it is lined up with the “TDC Tooth Number” (for this example 10). This is the 10th tooth “after the missing teeth” on the crank trigger wheel in the direction that the engine rotates. Install the crank trigger wheel and align the bolt holes on it such that the sensor will be near this position.

    Most all engines rotate clockwise, except for Honda engines which rotate counter-clockwise. If you are confused about which tooth this means, put the trigger wheel on the engine and rotate just the trigger wheel (leave the engine at TDC on #1) in the direction the engine rotates. Rotate it until the missing teeth/gap line up to where the sensor will be mounted, then continue turning it and count 10 teeth. Take a marker and mark this tooth. It will be the tooth you need to align with the sensor.

    2.0 CAM SYNC POSITIONING

    A cam sync pulse is required if you are running sequential fuel injection. This tells the ECU which cylinder is cylinder #1 (or the first cylinder in the firing order as entered in the software). The following describes setting this up for a “one pulse per fire” crank input as well as a “60-2” crank input.

    2.1 Cam Sync setup when using a “one pulse per fire” crank input

    For a "one pulse per fire crank” signal (ie a 4 pulse crank trigger on a V8), the cam sync signal must occur in a specific range to properly ident which cylinder is cylinder #1. If this is not done properly, individual cylinder trims will not be performed on the correct cylinder, or worse, if using individual coils, the wrong cylinder will be fired, potentially damaging the started, flexplate, or worse.

    The best way to determine the proper range is by using the following basic formula to determine the crank angle range that the cam ident can occur. An example is give afterwards along with a table that has certain combinations already calculated.

    Cam sync location (degrees BTDC #1) = "Ignition Reference Angle" + “A” + (“A” / 2)

    “Ignition Reference Angle” = Taken from Crank Sensor Setup in software

    “A” = Angle Between Crank Pulses (crank degrees between triggers on the crank sensor)


    “A” for a 8 cylinder = 90
    “A” for a 6 cylinder = 120
    “A” for a 4 cylinder = 180

    Using the formula above, plug in the “Ignition Reference Angle” you are using and the proper “A” value depending on the number of engine cylinders. The location calculated is the “ideal” location and can vary +/- 30 degrees or possibly more. If you are out of this range contact Holley Tech Service for options.

    Example - 8 cylinder with a Ignition Ref Angle of 60

    Cam Sync Location = 60 + 90 + 90/2 = 195 degrees BTDC #1

    Cam Sync Location = 60 + 90 + 45 = 195 degrees BTDC #1

    195 would be the centrally "perfect" location for this specific example. However, this location can vary by +/- 30 degrees from this nominal target value with no issue.

    Number of Cylinders Ignition Reference Angle Cam Trigger Location Range (BTDC #1)

    4 60 330 +/-30 degrees

    6 60 240 +/-30 degrees

    8 60 195 +/-30 degrees

    NOTE: If it is mechanically not possible to install the cam trigger in the proper location, the engine firing order can be changed to compensate.

    For details on this, contact Holley Tech Service at 1-866-GOHOLLEY.

    2.2 60-2 Cam Sync when using a 60-2 crank input

    When using a 60-2 crank sensor wheel, this cam sync signal trigger MUST occur:

    Before cylinder #1 is at TDC on the COMPRESSION STROKE, make sure that it is not occurring on the exhaust stroke.

    It also MUST occur at least 8 teeth (approximately 50 degrees) before the “missing teeth” are read by the crank position sensor. If the crank sensor is set up such that the 10th tooth after the missing teeth is at TDC, position the cam sensor such that it is between 110 -250 degrees before TDC on cylinder #1. This will create a proper position.

    This cam sync input can be configured as a magnetic or hall effect (digital rising or digital falling) input in the software. Make sure that if you are using a hall effect sensor, you have this set up properly as a rising or falling signal.

  6. #6

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    Thanks. And if I told ya what I found it would be an embarrassment to myself. So here is what I found LMAO. I have an older dial back timing light, and well need I say more. USER ERROR. Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha. I never even gave it a second thought. I pointed & shot and forgot to adjust the dial. So there ya have it. My moronic moment brought to you by...Me.

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