Quote Originally Posted by Holley EFI manual
Crank & Cam Sensor Diagnostics
One of the most frustrating problems that can occur with EFI is crank and cam sensor signal issues. In order for an EFI system to operate properly, it must get proper crank and cam sensor signals. If there is a crank or cam signal issue, such as missing or extra pulses, the Holley EFI systems will show this on a datalog. If you feel that you are experiencing a crank or cam sensor problem, take an Internal Datalog at 100 samples per second of the problem. Set the Internal ECU Datalogger (in Basic I/O) to Diagnostic Type 1. Add the "Diag #6-#9" channels to one of the Datalog View Screens and review it in the problem area. Once the engine is running, these positions should NEVER increment [increase]. If they do, it signals a crank or cam sensor signal problem. If you need help diagnosing this, it is recommended that you contact Holley Technical Support.
FYI: Digital Falling is much preferred. I've Datalogged the difference on the same Hall-Effect sensor, and Digital Rising had errors.
NOTE: Momentary RPM Errors while cranking/starting & turning engine off, are acceptable (per Doug F. @ Holley).

The Diagnostic channels changed with the new V2 EFI software.
At the present time, in order to view crank & cam signal integrity on a
Datalog, the "Diagnostic Type" must be set to "Type 1". See image below.
This will then display the individual data in the Datalog's Diag #2-#9.
However, Diag #6-#9 are the ones to watch for incrementing Errors.
They shouldn't increment once the engine is started/running.

CAM & CRANK (as listed in the Datalogger & Data Monitor):
Status.Diagnostic.Parameter.Value[2] = (_GLOB_VAR8_GAP_VERIFY_ERROR_count_)
Status.Diagnostic.Parameter.Value[3] = (_GLOB_VAR8_CRANK_FULL_SYNC_count_)
Status.Diagnostic.Parameter.Value[4] = (_GLOB_VAR8_CRANK_HALF_SYNC_count_)
Status.Diagnostic.Parameter.Value[5] = (_GLOB_VAR8_CRANK_STALL_count_)
Status.Diagnostic.Parameter.Value[6] = (_GLOB_VAR8_CRANK_ERROR_count_) Crank tooth count issue.
Status.Diagnostic.Parameter.Value[7] = (_GLOB_VAR8_CAM_EARLY_count_) Either a cam pulse early or a missing crank pulse.
Status.Diagnostic.Parameter.Value[8] = (_GLOB_VAR8_CRANK_SOFT_ERROR2_count_) Crank tooth count issue.
Status.Diagnostic.Parameter.Value[9] = (_GLOB_VAR8_CRANK_SOFT_ERROR1_count_) Crank tooth count issue.
Status.Diagnostic.Parameter.Value[10] = (Config.System.Ignition.Type)
Status.Diagnostic.Parameter.Value[11] = (U32)1E6

The Diagnostic Types in Basic I/O:
Type 1 = Crank & Cam Signal Integrity
Type 2 = WBO2 Left
Type 3 = WBO2 Right
Type 4 = Boost Control (When Controlling Intake Manifold Boost.)
Type 5 = Boost Control (When Controlling Wastegate Dome Pressure.)
Type 6 = Transmission
Type 7 = Currently Not Used
Type 8 = Currently Not Used
Type 9 = Currently Not Used
Type 10 = Currently Not Used


Crank & Cam Sensor Error Analysis:

If a crank or cam sensor issue is suspected during operation, the first step is to properly configure and record a datalog with crank/cam sensor diagnostic information. First, make sure that the logging diagnostic type is properly set. To verify this, open the System ICF, enter “Basic I/O”, select “Datalog”, and select “Type 1” for the Diagnostic Type. This will set diagnostic parameters to crank & cam information.

Once properly set, take a datalog of the issue. Setup one of the Datalog View Screens to contain the following parameters:
- Diag #6 (See above description in red.)
- Diag #7 (See above description in red.)

Review these parameters on the datalog. Once the engine is running, neither of these should increment (change). If either of these increment, it means that there is either a missing, or extra/false crank or cam signal. An easy way to quickly check is to simply put the cursor at the beginning of the datalog (after the engine is running), note the values, and then put it at the end of the datalog (before the engine is shut off). If the values don’t change, there isn't an issue. If they do, move the cursor though the datalog to find the point of the issue (where the values increment).

If the values increment, it's recommended to consider taking a “System Log" to further analyze the actual crank/cam signals.
If further help is required, contact your Holley EFI dealer, or Holley Technical support.
TIP:
• Sequential EFI users:
If it's unknown, whether a problem is with the crank or cam signal, run it in "Paired" mode (non-sequential).
DIS & CNP/COP users can only do this using a missing teeth trigger wheel (not 4x), because it can run solely off itself.
If it runs fine, the problem is with the cam sensor. If the problem still persists, it's with the crank sensor.

(CNP coils can also be fired in waste-spark mode, but it's not acceptable for long term use, due to their much higher dwell time.
CNP coils are simply not designed for this, however, it's still a good troubleshooting/emergency option if the cam sensor fails.)

• If the datalog indicates a cam/crank sensor error, I highly suggest you record a "System Log" (.SL suffix), so you can determine which sensor is malfunctioning and what it's doing wrong.
It's a special high speed datalog of the cam/crank signals that's in an oscilloscope type format. Depending on the severity of an RPM Error, the regular datalog doesn't always show it.

Quote Originally Posted by Doug F. @ Holley
With the EFI, we can do what we call a "System Log" or .SL log.
This basically gives an "oscilloscope" type high speed logging of the crank and cam signals.
• How to record a System Log (.SL) type of datalog:
A System Log is a new type of Internal Datalog that can record a high speed/resolution log of the crank and cam sensor signals. This can be extremely helpful and effective when trying to diagnose crank or cam signal integrity issues. To record a System Log, set the log type as "System Log" as shown in Figure 20. It will be stored as a file with an .SL extension in the internal log memory accessible by going to "Download ECU Datalogs" ("Datalog" drop down menu). To download Internal Datalogs, you must have the key-on, the EFI software in "USB Link" mode (not "Online") and select "Download ECU Datalogs" from the top Toolbar ("Datalog" drop down menu). The "clipboard" icon is not involved with downloading or retrieving Internal Datalogs. Also, always run Holley EFI software programs as an administrator.

An example log is shown in Figure 21. The crank and cam data is shown in a "digital" manner as the ECU sees internally, meaning it is active (signal is at a level of "1") or inactive (signal is at a level of "0"). If the signal is a Hall-Effect sensor, the SL crank and cam signals are indicative of the signal from the sensor (not actual voltage, but pattern). If the signal is from a Magnetic/VR sensor, which puts out a sine wave form, the SL log indicates when the ECU is triggered, not the actual wave form or voltage level.

The System Log is used to view missing or extra crank or cam pulses and can view the cam and crank signal relative positions. It also shows battery voltage, which is useful to see when an engine was cranking/starting (will show a drop in voltage). The Diag #1 (crank sensor) and Diag #2 (cam sensor) can be used by Holley Tech Service to further help.

Figure 20:

Figure 21:


NOTES:
• For Internal Datalogs & System Logs, you can "Enable Input for Internal ECU Log" ("Basic I/O" in "System Parameters"). Check marking that box
creates a switched input trigger for activating Internal Datalogs with a switch. Install & wire a pushbutton switch in an inconspicuous location;
it can be ground activated, so it's an easy one wire task. Then "Pin Map" the new Input to an available ECU connector input pin. Now you can
datalog instantaneously at any time, without a laptop in the vehicle. A necessity for diagnosing stubborn spots of a tune and/or instant data
acquisition. In "Setup ECU Logging" (top Toolbar - "Datalog"), select the Immediate "Start Method" and I suggest 50 FPS "Logging Rate", 50 sec
"Max Log Time". To download Internal Datalogs, you must have the key-on, the EFI software in "USB Link" mode (not "Online") and select
"Download ECU Datalogs" from the top Toolbar ("Datalog" drop down menu). The "clipboard" icon is not involved with downloading or retrieving
Internal Datalogs. Also, always run Holley EFI software programs as an administrator.

• Choosing "Immediate" (Setup ECU Logging) means the datalogger will activate when the switch is pressed.
You don't need the switch for the "Triggered" type of activation, but the ECU input criteria must be selected.
IF you choose to install a datalogger switch, it must also be activated for a "Triggered" type datalog to record.
Pressing the switch ("Triggered" type setup), only enables the Datalogger; the ECU input criteria activates it.
https://forums.holley.com/showthread...6511#post96511 (Internal Datalogging by Switch or TPS, 2-Step, Transbrake, etc.)

Immediate vs Triggered Start Methods
With “Immediate” & “Triggered” start methods and an option to use the ECU Log Trig Input, there are actually four combinations.
We will address these separately:

* Immediate Start Method with no ECU Log Trig – This combination results in logging as soon as the ECU is powered up and it
continues going until the ECU powers down or you hit the “Max Log Time.” If you hit the max time, then the ECU wraps up the file and
immediately starts a new one. If you want to log all of the time (including uneventful key-on time if the engine is not running) this one is
for you. It would be advisable to set the “Logging Rate” rate very low or you will fill up the storage space in short order, and set the “Max
Log Time” very high to avoid lots of little files.

* Immediate Start Method with ECU Log Trig – This combination results in starting the log based exclusively on the ECU Log Trig
input. That is pretty simple. The length of the log will be a function of the kind of switch you use and what you enter for “Max Log Time.”
If you're using a momentary switch, it is pretty simple. The momentary ECU Log Trig Input starts the log, and the length of the log is
set by the “Max Log Time.”
It essentially ignores the switch input until it finishes the log. If you're using a toggle switch, the log will go at
least for the time specified in the “Max Log Time”, but will continue beyond this time if the switch is still active.
Beyond this time as soon
as the switch is turned off the log stops. So really for this combination, the “Max Log Time” is actually specifies the minimum log time.

* Triggered Start Method with no ECU Log Trig – This combination is useful if you know you always want to record data at a certain
condition without having to worry about a switch. You can specify what condition will trigger the start of the log (like TPS>50,
RPM>3000, or MAP>110 for instance) and then the log simply goes for the time you specify in the “Max Log Time.” Meeting the trigger
conditions again during the log will not prolong the log, but of course meeting the trigger conditions again after a log is finished will start
a new log. Many people choose to setup the trigger conditions based on things you would see at the burnout for instance and then set
the log time long enough to capture the run.

* Triggered Start Method with ECU Log Trig – This combination is the strictest in that you have to have the ECU Log Trig input active
in combination with meeting the trigger condition based on the variable and threshold you selected. BOTH must be active at the same
time for the logging to start. While you can do this with a momentary switch input, you have to be confident that the trigger condition will
be met at the time you hit the switch. It might make more sense to use a toggle switch for the ECU Log Trig input when using this
combination. After being triggered the log will run for at least the length of time set in the log time, and will continue to run so long as the
ECU Log Trig input is active. What you do not have to do is select “ECU Log Trig” as the trigger input. That is already taken care of as a
predefined system input and can actually cause confusion and problems if you use it as a trigger condition as well.

Creating a Switched Input for the Internal Logger – A switched input can be created for the internal logger (+12V or Ground). Its
function is described in the start methods above. It's created by selecting the System Parameters ICF & Basic I/O – Datalog. Select
the "Enable Input for Internal ECU Log" to create this input.
• PC Datalogging does not involve "USB Link" mode or selecting "Download ECU Datalogs".
These two functions are for obtaining Internal Datalogs & System Logs only (ECU recorded).
For PC Datalogging, be "Online", and select "Open Data Log" to obtain the datalog.

• Simultaneously recording an Internal (ECU) & PC (laptop) datalog, is especially useful for
acquiring a System Log (crank & cam signals) and a Normal Datalog (full detail) of the same event.

• Record a System Log to verify crank & cam sensor signals. Check mark the "RPM", "Crank" & "Cam" channels. Look for a uniform,
uninterrupted crank or cam sensor signal pattern. The crank or cam sensor signal should never flatline (no pulse) or indicate an
RPM "Error" anywhere. Also, fully charge the battery and ensure the engine is cranking fast enough, at least 100+ RPM. Another
common issue, is trying to analyze a compressed view of a long System Log. Zoom In for detail - click & hold at one point of the
datalog, and drag & release to another point nearby. It's best to record short System Logs/Datalogs that capture the problem.

• Clicking to the right of each data channel check box, reveals "Smoothing" (Filtering), "Paneling" & "Scaling" options.
Filtering options are applied & saved to the datalog config (.graph) file, so filtering will be applied when the next datalog is opened.
Not everything is saveable, but clicking "File" (top left) & "Save", does save your data channel (left column) configuration changes.
Read pages 7 & 8 of the Holley EFI Datalogger Instructions: http://documents.holley.com/techlibr...9r10543rev.pdf.

• The Holley EFI ECU records everything, but the datalogger (EFI software) displays only the channels you've selected.
Click the "E" (top Toolbar) to edit what the datalogger displays. In the Data Monitor/Datalogger, clicking on the letter
"E" allows you to Edit (add/delete) data channels for each View List. Drag & drop data channels to & from the View Lists.
The data channel list (left side of Graph Setup) is very long, so you need to scroll it to the right to see every channel.
http://documents.holley.com/techlibr...r10632rev5.pdf (V2 EFI Software Update Overview - Section 9.1 "Internal Parameters", Page 12)

• I find the most helpful datalog function, is overlaying the datalog on your Global File.
I'm in the habit of using the datalog Overlay feature every time I review a datalog.
Click on "Datalog" (on the top Toolbar), "Activate Overlay", then "Open Data Log".
You can literally "playback" a recorded event, and watch it as it happened on any screen.
Minimize (shrink) the datalog window, and move it to the bottom of any Global Folder screen.
Then click & scroll anywhere on the datalog, and watch it playback on your Global Folder (EFI software).

• Always provide data, not just symptoms. Is the AFR & ignition timing optimized? Overlay a datalog onto your Global Folder.
Ensure the Target A/F Ratio table is properly programmed for your engine. Ensure the ECU is "Learning" (Learn Table LINK).
Scroll through the datalog to the problem area. Then look exactly where this happens on the Base Fuel & Timing Tables.
Scrutinize RPM, MAP, TPS, CTS, IAC, Target AFR, AFR Left, CL Comp, Ignition Timing, Duty Cycle, Fuel Pressure & Battery.

• "Basic I/O" has a new option to log various diagnostic channels in a datalog (Internal ECU Datalogger). These can be used by Holley
Technical Services to help a customer diagnose various issues. If you have an issue with the crank/cam signals, WBO2 Sensors, Boost
Control, or Transmission; select the appropriate channel, take datalogs and contact Holley Tech Service. "Type 1" is the default setting
and the most commonly used.
Type 1 = Crank & Cam Signal Integrity
Type 2 = WBO2 Left
Type 3 = WBO2 Right
Type 4 = Boost Control (When Controlling Intake Manifold Boost.)
Type 5 = Boost Control (When Controlling Wastegate Dome Pressure.)
Type 6 = Transmission
Type 7 = Currently Not Used
Type 8 = Currently Not Used
Type 9 = Currently Not Used
Type 10 = Currently Not Used

• Zipped Datalog Files - Internal Datalogs are now internally stored in a compressed file format. When you download them from the ECU,
they'll have a ".dlz" file extension. When you open the file, it will unzip automatically and save it as a ".dl" datalog (uncompressed, same
as previous format). Software version 2.2.0.3 or higher must be used to properly download and open these internal logs.

The DLZ is simply a DL file with rudimentary data compression applied so that the download speed is faster. The DLZ files can be opened
directly with the Datalog Viewer, which will first convert them to the expanded DL format. You can launch the Datalog Viewer by clicking
"Open Data Log" under the "Datalog" entry of the menu bar in the main Holley software. Clicking on the DL or DLZ files in "Windows
Explorer" or similar utility will not launch the Datalog Viewer.

For very large files this conversion will add some time the first time you open a DLZ and can feel like the software has experienced an
error. Windows can even declare that the Holley software is not responding, but it may just be processing the DLZ in preparation of
opening. If you go back to open a previous datalog and you have the option of opening the DLZ or the DL of the same name, remember
the DL will open more quickly since it is already decompressed. If you are archiving datalogs, you really only need the DL or the DLZ
and compressing with a common PC "Zip" tool will save quite a bit of space even when compressing DLZ files.

Originally Posted by Danny Cabral
Quick Datalogger Information:

Always provide data, not just symptoms. Is the AFR & ignition timing optimized? Overlay the datalog onto your Global File.
Ensure the Target A/F Ratio table is properly programmed for your engine. Ensure the ECU is "Learning" (Learn Table LINK).
Scroll through the datalog to the problem area. Then look exactly where this happens on the Base Fuel & Timing Tables. Scrutinize:
RPM, MAP, MAT, TPS, CTS, IAC, Target AFR, AFR Left, CL Comp, Ignition Timing, Duty Cycle, Fuel Flow, Fuel Pressure & Battery.

Using the Holley EFI software (LINK), look at where the live cursor moves to during this occurrence, and
manually tune that area of the Base Fuel Table (enrich or lean) & Base Timing Table (optimize ignition timing).


I find the most helpful datalog function, is overlaying the datalog on your Global File.
I'm in the habit of using the datalog Overlay feature every time I review a datalog.
Click on "Datalog" (on the top Toolbar), "Activate Overlay", then "Open Data Log".
You can literally "playback" a recorded event, and watch it as it happened on any screen.
Minimize (shrink) the datalog window, and move it to the bottom of any Global File screen.
Then click & scroll anywhere on the datalog, and watch it playback on your Global File (EFI software).
http://documents.holley.com/techlibr...9r10543rev.pdf (Holley EFI Datalogger Instructions)
https://forums.holley.com/showthread...s-amp-Datalogs (Datalog & System Log Information - Read "NOTES")
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iqHO...C6FEA0BB99AF17 (How To Record & Email A Datalog)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q7OZUXLRS1Q (How To Record A System Log & Diagnose A No-Start Condition)
https://forums.holley.com/showthread...7531#post77531 (Closed Loop Datalog Tuning - Posts #2, #4 & #6)
Originally Posted by Danny Cabral
Crank & Cam Sensor Wiring Tips:
The 10-pin Ignition Connector has one "Chassis Ground" (loose black wire ground) and two "IPU Grounds" (clean ECU ground). Don't use "Chassis Ground" to ground an ignition module (or crank & cam sensors). It's quick & easy to move the ignition module ground wire from (cavity) pin D "Chassis Ground" to pin C or G "IPU Ground", where it should be.

If you don't have the actual Metri-Pack terminal release tool, a "safety pin" will work.
It just needs to be a stiff wire between .030"-.035" in diameter to release the terminal tab.
Then reopen (bend) the terminal tab before reinsertion, so it will clip (lock) into the cavity.
http://www.whiteproducts.com/removal_tools.shtml (T-6 Micro Terminal Release Pick Tool)

Also, don't use (cavity) pin E "Switched +12V" from the 10-pin Ignition Connector, to power an ignition module (or crank & cam sensors), unless you've modified the wiring source to connect from pin B20 - EST 12V Output (P1B ECU Connector). This LINK explains why & how to do it.
http://documents.holley.com/techlibr...10555rev17.pdf (Holley EFI Wiring Manual, Sections 2.1 "Pin-Outs" & 13.0 "Wiring Appendix")