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Thread: No RPM signal. Problem with crank sensor?

  1. #21

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    Just a small quick update. I brought my Dominator ECU over to a buddy's house, and threw it in his working car. He started his car successfully, so I can now check that off of the list of a possible fault. My ECU checks out good. Now I can get down to an electronics technician perspective of what's going on with the crank signal issue. I will update again when I have more news.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Danny Cabral View Post
    Well, the LS 24x crank sensor reads two reluctor rings as one; it's a weird setup. So maybe the datalog won't read you waving something against it.
    You may need to temporarily change the Custom Ignition Parameters to "1 Pulse/Fire" Crank Sensor, click "Save" and cycle the ignition switch off/on.
    May God's grace bless you in the Lord Jesus Christ.
    '92 Ford Mustang GT: 385" SBF, Dart SHP 8.2 block, TFS TW 11R 205 heads, 11.8:1 comp, TFS R-Series intake, Dominator MPFI & DIS, 36-1 crank trigger/1x cam sync, 160A 3G alternator, Optima Red battery, A/C, 100HP progressive dry direct-port NOS, Spal dual 12" fans/3-core Frostbite aluminum radiator, Pypes dual 2.5" exhaust/off-road X-pipe/shorty headers, S&W subframe connectors, LenTech Strip Terminator wide-ratio AOD/3000 RPM converter, FPP aluminum driveshaft, FPP 3.31 gears, Cobra Trac-Lok differential, Moser 31 spline axles, '04 Cobra 4-disc brakes, '93 Cobra booster & M/C, 5-lug Bullitt wheels & 245/45R17 MT tires.

  3. #23

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    Yeah, that's a good idea. I'll try this method when troubleshooting.

  4. #24
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    And you might as well select Cam Sensor Type "Not Used", to eliminate it from the troubleshooting diagnostics.
    May God's grace bless you in the Lord Jesus Christ.
    '92 Ford Mustang GT: 385" SBF, Dart SHP 8.2 block, TFS TW 11R 205 heads, 11.8:1 comp, TFS R-Series intake, Dominator MPFI & DIS, 36-1 crank trigger/1x cam sync, 160A 3G alternator, Optima Red battery, A/C, 100HP progressive dry direct-port NOS, Spal dual 12" fans/3-core Frostbite aluminum radiator, Pypes dual 2.5" exhaust/off-road X-pipe/shorty headers, S&W subframe connectors, LenTech Strip Terminator wide-ratio AOD/3000 RPM converter, FPP aluminum driveshaft, FPP 3.31 gears, Cobra Trac-Lok differential, Moser 31 spline axles, '04 Cobra 4-disc brakes, '93 Cobra booster & M/C, 5-lug Bullitt wheels & 245/45R17 MT tires.

  5. #25

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    True story. Thanks again. As a side note, I've sent an email to Holley Tech support and got an initial response. I will be working with them also to get this fixed.

  6. #26

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    OK, have a new update! So, the more & more I kept measuring, the more I was getting values anywhere between 70 & 110 thousands. So a lot more than I needed. I tested with the crank sensor plugged in, but not on the engine, and measured voltage on the correct wire, and waved some metal in front of it, etc. So that will give me some variation in the voltage, so I got to thinking, it absolutely has to be this air gap thing. So since I had three crank sensors at my disposal, I decided to cut one down a little bit, and then put it in. I did this, and then I hooked up the laptop, and prepared to do a SL. I go to crank and start logging, and much to my surprise (it scared the crap out of me) the car started for the first time. I quickly turned it off, as I was not really ready to start the car.

    So in summary, I have a question. If the crank centerline is a constant, and the all reluctor wheels should be within probably 5 thousands max of each other in diameter, and the engine blocks are some of the best tolerance control on the market, what in the world could possibly cause my crank sensor to be too far away from the reluctor? This is a brand new engine from an engine builder, so there is no dirt or gunk anywhere to speak of.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Masnart View Post
    So in summary, I have a question. If the crank centerline is a constant, and the all reluctor wheels should be within probably 5 thousands max of each other in diameter, and the engine blocks are some of the best tolerance control on the market, what in the world could possibly cause my crank sensor to be too far away from the reluctor? This is a brand new engine from an engine builder, so there is no dirt or gunk anywhere to speak of.
    This is why I kept mentioning the sensor air gap. Is the crankshaft factory OEM or aftermarket? I've only dealt with this problem with aftermarket engine parts. This is more prevalent on aftermarket crankshafts & camshafts. Check the reluctor radial run-out & sensor air gap.
    May God's grace bless you in the Lord Jesus Christ.
    '92 Ford Mustang GT: 385" SBF, Dart SHP 8.2 block, TFS TW 11R 205 heads, 11.8:1 comp, TFS R-Series intake, Dominator MPFI & DIS, 36-1 crank trigger/1x cam sync, 160A 3G alternator, Optima Red battery, A/C, 100HP progressive dry direct-port NOS, Spal dual 12" fans/3-core Frostbite aluminum radiator, Pypes dual 2.5" exhaust/off-road X-pipe/shorty headers, S&W subframe connectors, LenTech Strip Terminator wide-ratio AOD/3000 RPM converter, FPP aluminum driveshaft, FPP 3.31 gears, Cobra Trac-Lok differential, Moser 31 spline axles, '04 Cobra 4-disc brakes, '93 Cobra booster & M/C, 5-lug Bullitt wheels & 245/45R17 MT tires.

  8. #28

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    The crank is a K1 brand 3.622" crankshaft. I guess I didn't think about that being a problem, as it should still hold the reluctor wheel the same way/the reluctor wheel does not change sizes. So unless there was some horrible radial run-out like you suggested, I still am confused. And even then, I don't think the car would start with that bad of run-out.

    Meanwhile while I try to remedy my confusion, I still need to find out a way to securely mount this sensor. Because without a base all the way around the sensor to seat against the block, I don't really feel that comfortable with this crank sensor. I'll have to figure something out.

    I just got to thinking about something. The block that my builder used was a newer style block, from what I understand. It is possible that this block MAY have originally been a 58x motor? With that being said, and the fact that mine has a 24x in it now, I wonder if this dimension is different between the two blocks? Measured from crank centerline to the mating surface where the crank sensor would sit against.

    Click image for larger version. 

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  9. #29
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    Some users have dealt with reluctor radial run-out problems (LINK), others with sensor air gap problems (LINK), and others with improperly installed/positioned crank reluctors (LINK). Again, this is more prevalent on aftermarket crankshafts & camshafts. I've only dealt with these problems with aftermarket engine parts.
    May God's grace bless you in the Lord Jesus Christ.
    '92 Ford Mustang GT: 385" SBF, Dart SHP 8.2 block, TFS TW 11R 205 heads, 11.8:1 comp, TFS R-Series intake, Dominator MPFI & DIS, 36-1 crank trigger/1x cam sync, 160A 3G alternator, Optima Red battery, A/C, 100HP progressive dry direct-port NOS, Spal dual 12" fans/3-core Frostbite aluminum radiator, Pypes dual 2.5" exhaust/off-road X-pipe/shorty headers, S&W subframe connectors, LenTech Strip Terminator wide-ratio AOD/3000 RPM converter, FPP aluminum driveshaft, FPP 3.31 gears, Cobra Trac-Lok differential, Moser 31 spline axles, '04 Cobra 4-disc brakes, '93 Cobra booster & M/C, 5-lug Bullitt wheels & 245/45R17 MT tires.

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